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So, my blog has been a little quiet of late. For me it's the busy season, full of new clients and their projects, and existing clients looking to make improvements to their site, not to mention my clients on retainer whom I do regular work for.

All this means is that my own site, my own content marketing, has been by the wayside.

I've seen the amount of traffic to my site decrease along with the number of leads. While right now that's not a problem, as I'm busy, it does mean in a few months when current work slows down I may be scrambling.

For a freelancer that's a big deal, but it's still a big deal for your business as well.

When things are hopping, marketing your business and continuously generating content is not as big a priority. If you're like most folks these days and wear many hats in your day job, you may need to focus on implementation or operations instead of marketing.

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If your prospects and clients aren't hearing from you regularly, there's less potential opportunities down the road. Your unsubscribe rate may increase because people don't remember why you're in their inbox, and the whole inbound methodology starts to wane for your sales reps.

My post today is just me sharing my experience with letting my subscribers down, and should serve as a reminder to post regularly to your blog or email list on your business, recent things your company has done, relevant content your prospects are interested in, and how you're consistently managing to delight your customers.

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